<< Previous Post:
Next Post: >>

August 27, 2007

Uh oh! Rethinking Jar Lids

 

After all my hoopla about using hydrogen peroxide to clean the inside of tomato sauce jar lids, I’m now having second thoughts. Sorry to get prematurely excited.

A few days ago, after “bleaching” the tomato stains out of a couple of lids with hydrogen peroxide, I noticed that the smell was not completely gone. So I added another round of hydrogen peroxide and left them in the sun some more. Well, this time, not only did the tomato break down, but so did the coating on the inside of the lid! And that got me thinking…

Could the coating on the inside of prepared foods jar lids be the same stuff (polycarbonate) that lines the insides of aluminum cans these days? And if so, does using hydrogen peroxide on it cause it to leach Bisphenol-A?

I’ve been trying to find information on the web about what that coating is, but I’m having a hard time finding a definitive answer. So I sent e-mails to several companies (Classico, Newman’s Own, Francesco Rinaldi) asking for information about the inside coating. I also e-mailed Jarden, the company that makes Ball canning jars and lids, to find out what their lids are made of.

Scott at Least Footprint wrote that he reuses spaghetti sauce jars and buys new lids for them. Maybe this is the better option, if the original lids are lined with something we don’t want to reuse.

Other options I have found online are to line the inside of the lid with beeswax or to put a layer of parchment paper between the lid and the jar.

I will continue to update as I get further information. If anyone else has information about the coating inside the lids of glass jars, please share with the class. We are all here to learn.
 



Print Print

 

<< Previous Post:
Next Post: >>

Comments

A Note about leaving comments: I switched to the LifeFyre comment system because it weeds out the hundreds of spam comments I was getting each day and also allows us to respond to individual comments, to "Like" comments, and to link them to social media if we so desire. But if you do not wish to login via social media, you don't have to. You can comment without logging in! Here's how:

  1. Type your comment in the box.
  2. Click "Post Comment As" button.
  3. When the LiveFyre box pops up, type a name, email address, and optional website address in the fields provided.
  4. Click Next.
  5. LiveFyre will ask you for a user name and password. But if you don't want to register or use a password, you don't have to. Just click "Post as Guest" which is to the left of the black "Finish" button. Your comment will be saved.
  6. Please email me if you have questions or problems. This new system is supposed to make it easier for all of us to converse, not harder.
5 comments
Beany
Beany

I had the audacity to believe I was one of a kind with my views on plastic and what not...but I am so glad I found your blog.Regarding this problem...I soak the lids in borax solution (borax+water and it works well) or a soap water solution for a few days. Since I use it to store dry goods or homemade tomato sauce, the smell (if any) doesn't both me. I usually make my own tomato sauce since I want to eliminate bring in all sorts of containers into the household - including glass . So I reuse the tomato jars to hold homemade tomato sauce. The basic pasta/pizza sauce I make is very simple, and I make big batches.

Rosa
Rosa

Beth, thank you for thinking about this and looking into it. I reuse a *lot* of spaghetti jar lids - in fact, I buy the brand that uses lids that work on Mason jars so I can use them when I'm storing things in mason jars (like dry goods & leftovers). I never thought about what that coating is. The best way to get rid of the smells, I think, is to just wash the jar & lid with soapy water and then leave them to dry for about a week. When you close up the jar before it's really, really dry, the smell seems to intensify (or worse it can smell musty.) It also gets better after 2 or 3 uses.

Least Footprint
Least Footprint

Beth, I should point out that some spaghetti sauces come with the screw-on lid and some have the twist-off lids. The screw lid type take the regular mason jar lids you can buy at the store. The twist-off type can be refitted with a new lid available from Kitchen Krafts. I have in my assortment of jars some of the screw lid spaghetti sauce jars, and a few from preserves as well, but have not yet found the need to retrofit the twist-off jars. But, if you want, Kitchen Krafts is the only one I know of with the twist-off lids in small quantities. They are $3.00 a dozen but if that is all you want to order the shipping will get you.

Post Popularity Graphing by Knowledge Ring