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January 11, 2008

Brita, Green Sangha, Recycled Clothing, 2 Clean 2 B Green, Composts & Landfills & Muddy Shoes, oh my!

 

04/14/2008 Update: If you’ve reached this page because you want to know how to recycle Brita filter cartridges in North America, please visit http://www.takebackthefilter.org for more information about the campaign to urge Clorox (owner of Brita in North America) to develop a take-back recycling program for these cartridges!

I’ve been working on so many other projects this week, I didn’t have time to post yesterday, and I barely have time to post tonight. So here are a couple of things I’ve been doing and also a couple of posts on other blogs that I think are just great:

1) I received enough interest in a possible Brita cartridge recycling campaign that I created a Yahoo Group to discuss the issue further and get feedback on whether or not to proceed. Here’s the URL for the Yahoo Group if you’d like to read more or participate:
http://groups.yahoo.com/group/recycle_brita/

2) I’ve been working on Green Sangha’s Rethinking Plastics web page. Here’s the link. If you’re in the Bay Area and would like to get involved, please check it out.

3) National Geographic’s Green Guide has an excellent, eye-opening article about what happens to donated clothes, surprisingly entitled “What Happens to Donated Clothes?” by Emily Main.  (2011 Update: Apparently, the article no longer exists on the Internets.  *Sniff*)

4) Wise Bread has a great post called Our Obsession to Clean is Making Us Trashy. This is a web site about saving money, and often (although not always) green living and frugality intersect in its articles.

5) Yesterday, I visited a local landfill and commercial compost facility to see for myself what happens to our garbage and the food and yard waste we put into our green bins. I’ll be writing about this field trip later.

6) I have to jump on the Yay China! bandwagon (And also Yay Australia!) for their plastic bag ban. Now, if only they’d stop accepting our plastic waste.

7) And one more thing… Next week I’m flying to Hawaii to visit my parents for a few days (and hopefully get my blow dryer fixed.) Are there any Fake Plastic Fish readers in Honolulu (besides my dad) who have tips about local farmer’s markets, organic restaurants, other “green” must-sees and must-dos? Please feel free to comment or contact me via e-mail. My e-mail address is in my profile.



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6 comments
Chris
Chris

Wow!!!!!Yay to China?????Yes a plastic bag ban would be awesome (how long til then, and how enforceable in this day)But, wow, there is just, wow, all the other stuff that makes that a drop in the ocean (not bucket, ocean)The one that scream first to me (greenwise) is the trillions (maybe more) they are spending on coal fired power plants, 2 per week go online for 5-10 years or some ridiculous amount like that. Just to try and catch up with our standard of living, as if the way they lived for thousands of years in proud tradition was crap and ours is roses in the sewers.Maybe someone else can chime in on the atrocities of human suffering and other shenanigans the Chinese government has imposed on its people.

Mazzajo
Mazzajo

Suburban farmer - Enviro minister Garrett announced by the end of 2008 there would be a ban on free supermarket bags - this probably means everyone will be happily paying for them instead! But it's a positive step forward!!! (gotta have hope!)Just for the record, I think the biggest hurdle will be "but what will I line my garbage bins with?"

Suburban Farmer
Suburban Farmer

Not sure why Australia is getting a 'Yay!' we have reduced consumption of plastic bags by about a third but we haven't banned them (except for one or two towns). Major supermarket chains don't want a ban or a levy on bags and one guy from a retailers association said something like 'but where would people put their stuff when they go shopping?' Duh! We have a long way to go.

David T.
David T.

I grew up in Hawaii and there are some great places to go. First, there are two wonderful markets in the Moiliili neighborhood of Honolulu. The first, which I used to frequent and highly recommend, is the humble Kokua Market, www.kokua.coop. The other is now a chain but their flagship store is literally right across the street, Down to Earth, www.downtoearth.org. If you'll be on any other islands, I'd recommend looking into the bountiful Hilo farmer's market. I know there are some markets in Honolulu, but my friends and I used to just exchange the produce that grew in each other's yards, so we hadn't a real need for one. You'll also find that many restaurants use local products, mainly to bring freshness to food that would otherwise be a long boat ride away from its source.There are many wonderful things about Hawaii's local agriculture, but among my favorites is the fact that Honey produced on outer islands (NOT Oahu) is Varroa mite-free and therefore often organic. Hawaii is one of the few places on earth that can, and does, produce organic honey. A must!Enjoy the mountains and the ocean.David T.New York, NY

The Biscuit Queen
The Biscuit Queen

Another way to recycle clothes are sewing and crafts projects. I have made several quilts from old jeans and flannel shirts, and you can make pillows from button down shirts, baby clothes, sweaters and jeans as well. Also, you can use old t-shirts to boondoggle awesome tug toys for your dog. A garage sale is a wonderful way to recyle old clothing in good shape. A few towns over they have a huge annual boy scout sale, and they accept donations of anything from clothing to furnature to books. The scouts then do all the work selling and get to keep the proceeds. You can get a bag of clothes for a dollar! Of course they use plastic bags, but you could bring your own or bring a canvas tote the same size.

Kylinsmom
Kylinsmom

Thanks so much for the link and for the clever "alternative" title! I am just starting to venture into articles addressing green issues, and your support is encouraging! Also, the Brita information is invaluable! Keep up the great work!

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