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Are all plastics bad?
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greenluv
1
November 20, 2015 - 5:27 pm

Are all plastics bad like the creator of this blog thinks? My dad and I were talking about reducing the use of plastic in our household, which includes the kitchen, and then I talked to him about plastic wrap and packaging in food along with plastic utensils like the rice spatula and he claimed that all plastics aren’t bad which caused an argument. Would you agree or disagree with him, especially when he calls the creator of this blog irrational? Is it irrational to avoid plastic or not?

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Beth Terry
419 Posts
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2
November 21, 2015 - 11:06 am

I have some answers for you, but since I’m the creator of this blog, perhaps it would be better to see if anyone else weighs in first.

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Casbes
3
November 29, 2015 - 8:28 am

I started looking at the consequences of plastic use after reading a news report linking exposure to plastic in items such as pizza boxes to testicular cancer.  Having just gone through the very painful experience of having my 20 year old son diagnosed with stage 4 testicular cancer I decided to avoid plastic as much as possible.  Out went all of our plastic storage containers, plastic utensils, plastic wrap, etc.  I learned that plastic wrap is actually considered a food additive by the FDA due to its contact with things like the meat you buy in plastic wrapped packages.  Have I eliminated all plastic from our lives?  NO!  But I try!

As it relates to testicular cancer, here are some things to consider:  Testicular cancer rates have doubled since the 1940’s and the reported annual rate of increase is 3% a year.  Plastics chemicals can  react with estrogen receptors in the body and many testicular cancers can cause hCG to go up; this is the hormone which is measured by pregnancy tests so some men who have testicular cancer will come back with a positive pregnancy test.  Researchers have suggested that maternal exposure to estrogenic active chemicals during pregnancy may be linked to testicular cancer.  Men with testicular cancer experience gynecomastia, the enlargement of breasts.  All of this leads me to believe it is important to avoid plastic and its effect on estrogen receptors in our bodies.

I try to make as many changes as I can to reduce plastics in our lives.  I struggle with things like shampoo and conditioner containers but I’ve succeeded in reducing the amount I use by washing my hair less frequently, using less per shampoo, etc.  I take my own containers to the grocery store and buy in bulk when possible.  It was so hard in the beginning but I was VERY motivated by keeping my son safe.  He is 8 months in remission and I am still afraid every day.  It makes me sad that we live in a world where most people blindly accept disposable, wasteful and potentially health stealing convenience items that I believe will prove to ultimately be not so convenient at all.

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greenluv
4
November 29, 2015 - 3:43 pm

Casbes said
I started looking at the consequences of plastic use after reading a news report linking exposure to plastic in items such as pizza boxes to testicular cancer.  Having just gone through the very painful experience of having my 20 year old son diagnosed with stage 4 testicular cancer I decided to avoid plastic as much as possible.  Out went all of our plastic storage containers, plastic utensils, plastic wrap, etc.  I learned that plastic wrap is actually considered a food additive by the FDA due to its contact with things like the meat you buy in plastic wrapped packages.  Have I eliminated all plastic from our lives?  NO!  But I try!

As it relates to testicular cancer, here are some things to consider:  Testicular cancer rates have doubled since the 1940’s and the reported annual rate of increase is 3% a year.  Plastics chemicals can  react with estrogen receptors in the body and many testicular cancers can cause hCG to go up; this is the hormone which is measured by pregnancy tests so some men who have testicular cancer will come back with a positive pregnancy test.  Researchers have suggested that maternal exposure to estrogenic active chemicals during pregnancy may be linked to testicular cancer.  Men with testicular cancer experience gynecomastia, the enlargement of breasts.  All of this leads me to believe it is important to avoid plastic and its effect on estrogen receptors in our bodies.

I try to make as many changes as I can to reduce plastics in our lives.  I struggle with things like shampoo and conditioner containers but I’ve succeeded in reducing the amount I use by washing my hair less frequently, using less per shampoo, etc.  I take my own containers to the grocery store and buy in bulk when possible.  It was so hard in the beginning but I was VERY motivated by keeping my son safe.  He is 8 months in remission and I am still afraid every day.  It makes me sad that we live in a world where most people blindly accept disposable, wasteful and potentially health stealing convenience items that I believe will prove to ultimately be not so convenient at all.

Casbes said
I started looking at the consequences of plastic use after reading a news report linking exposure to plastic in items such as pizza boxes to testicular cancer.  Having just gone through the very painful experience of having my 20 year old son diagnosed with stage 4 testicular cancer I decided to avoid plastic as much as possible.  Out went all of our plastic storage containers, plastic utensils, plastic wrap, etc.  I learned that plastic wrap is actually considered a food additive by the FDA due to its contact with things like the meat you buy in plastic wrapped packages.  Have I eliminated all plastic from our lives?  NO!  But I try!

As it relates to testicular cancer, here are some things to consider:  Testicular cancer rates have doubled since the 1940’s and the reported annual rate of increase is 3% a year.  Plastics chemicals can  react with estrogen receptors in the body and many testicular cancers can cause hCG to go up; this is the hormone which is measured by pregnancy tests so some men who have testicular cancer will come back with a positive pregnancy test.  Researchers have suggested that maternal exposure to estrogenic active chemicals during pregnancy may be linked to testicular cancer.  Men with testicular cancer experience gynecomastia, the enlargement of breasts.  All of this leads me to believe it is important to avoid plastic and its effect on estrogen receptors in our bodies.

I try to make as many changes as I can to reduce plastics in our lives.  I struggle with things like shampoo and conditioner containers but I’ve succeeded in reducing the amount I use by washing my hair less frequently, using less per shampoo, etc.  I take my own containers to the grocery store and buy in bulk when possible.  It was so hard in the beginning but I was VERY motivated by keeping my son safe.  He is 8 months in remission and I am still afraid every day.  It makes me sad that we live in a world where most people blindly accept disposable, wasteful and potentially health stealing convenience items that I believe will prove to ultimately be not so convenient at all.

Thankfully, I also had to get rid of the plastic cups in the kitchen. I was afraid of them. And I wouldn’t eat or drink anything out of plastic or styrofoam containers at all. I also want to replace my shower curtain with a hemp one and use other none plastic items. Does this sound irrational of me?

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