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June 28, 2009

Basilbias-Week Number Three

 

plasticwk3sm

Plastic Sticker
Discovered when I went to use my new cast-iron pot to make vegetable stock.

Three Produce Stickers
One from a lemon, two from nectarines.

Plastic-Windowed Box
I ordered lasagna noodles from Planet Organics because I needed another item to complete my order. They were very good, but I will try to find them in bulk next time.

Plastic-lined Jar Lid
From Muir Glen organic tomato sauce, which I bought rather than a plastic-lined can of tomatoes. The sauce was so innocent-looking in its glass jar and metal lid, who knew there was plastic lurking just inside? In the summer, I usually make tomato sauce from scratch, but tomatoes aren’t quite in season yet and a lasagna was in order, due to the tofu ricotta I made way too much of last week.

Cap
From a tamari bottle that ran out.

Seal
From the new tamari bottle I subsequently opened.

Piece of Tape
I forget what this came off of.

Expired Credit Card
Shown cut-up in the photo for obvious reasons.

Stencil Cut-Outs
We stenciled old t-shirts to wear to the Dyke March.

Plastic Cup
From the March. Inexcusable, I know. I was very thirsty and I forgot my water bottle. (I did my penance though, carrying a sticky cup around for the rest of the day…)

Items: 12
Total: 1 ¼ Ounces

This week, besides the plastic cup, I refused to buy anything I knew contained plastic. Between avoiding all animal products and all plastic, I have to say this made my grocery shopping incredibly difficult. For instance, I wanted to make burritos, but all the tortillas and vegan cheeses came in plastic. So I didn’t get them, thinking I could do without the cheese and make the tortillas from scratch. When the time came, however, I was rushed and so ended up making a sort of cheese-and-tortilla-less Mexicanesque stir-fry. Not one of my culinary masterpieces, to be sure. (My friends, though, were very sweet and ate it anyway.)
How long will I be able to keep this up? Although I’ve always been pretty good at doing without things, in combination with my old ones (nothing new [besides food and undergarments,] nothing grown with pesticides, nothing produced where workers were likely to have been paid unfair wages, nothing sold at large chain stores, and nothing containing animal products) my new purchasing restriction (nothing packaged in plastic) seems a little extreme even for me.
But I think the difficulty lies in the planning, since in most cases it’s the convenience and not the taste of plastic-wrapped foods that their homemade counterparts lack. I went to the grocery store this week without a list. If I had taken the trouble to look up a recipe beforehand, my stir-fry would most likely have taken a more palatable form, with or without the tortillas.

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3 comments
basilbias
basilbias

Yeah, I thought at first that avoiding plastic would be a cinch, since I'm already accustomed to doing without so much else. But it really is everywhere...

Kathryn McGrath
Kathryn McGrath

It's so interesting that avoiding plastic is the most difficult of all those consumer choices you list! That really says something about the ubiquitousness of plastic.

Fake Plastic Fish
Fake Plastic Fish

Your plastic level is about the same as mine. Awesome. It makes me happy to know that you are using all the resources that we have here in the bay Area. So many others don't, and I'm constantly wondering why not.(BTW, I don't count metal jar lids in my tally. But that's my choice that I wrote about here: http://www.fakeplasticfish.com/2007/11/hidden-plastic.html) It's great that you choose to be super mindful of every bit of plastic that comes your way.