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December 20, 2007

Evert Fresh Update

 

In my November 7 post about Evert Fresh bags, I expressed my frustration that people seeking to go plastic-free were buying these bags, believing that the bags were not made from petroleum-based plastic. I explained that this mistaken belief came from misleading or missing information on various web sites.

I’m now happy to report that after many emails and phone calls to these companies, at least three web sites have been updated with the correct information. Greenfeet was the first to fix their listing on Amazon.com, rewording the description to state that the “bags are made from a low-density polyethylene plastic (#4) impregnated with a natural clay based mineral that absorbs ethylene.” Now, it appears that while Greenfeet still sells the bags on its own site, it is no longer selling them through Amazon.com.

Amazon seller 877MYJUICER also changed the product description to say that the “bags are made from low-density polyethylene plastic materials….”

And after my persistent e-mails and phone calls to Reusablebags.com, they have updated their Evert Fresh description to read, “Evert Fresh bags are made from low density polyethylene that is coated with a fine layer of natural clay containing high levels of a mineral proven to absorb ethylene gas.” I am particularly happy about the change to the Reusablebags.com site since it caters to people looking for plastic-free options.

The changes to the Evert Fresh bag descriptions on these sites gives people the information they need to make decisions about whether or not to purchase the bags. So I’m glad for that. I personally won’t be buying them, as I stated in my earlier post, because I don’t like the idea of using a petroleum-based non-biodegradable plastic bag to keep food fresh a little bit longer.

Wouldn’t it be great if someone came up with a compostable bag using the same natural clay technology as Evert Fresh that would keep food fresh until then end of the bag’s useful life and then be composted with other green materials? Wouldn’t it be great if everyone composted, if even a little bit? Or stopped to think before buying too much food in the first place? These are a few things on my holiday wish list.

So this issue isn’t finished for me. There are still a few sites giving somewhat misleading information about the bags. But more importantly, it seems like there is an opportunity here for someone to come up with a truly “green” competing product. I’d love to find the person or company with the knowledge and desire to make something like that happen.
 



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9 comments
tinsel
tinsel

I am overwhelmed!  I stumbled on to Plastic Free yesterday and I realize the little things I've been doing since Aug. last year are not very much!  As a cancer survivor, you would think I'd have been onto this plastic issue much sooner, but noooo...I have made a start, though. I haven't bought laundry or dish soap, shampoo or body wash, deodorant or anti-perspirant, etc., since last summer!  I've been making all that stuff myself.  My trash removal company won't take recyclables, I found out yesterday.  Not happy about that.  So what do I do with all the plastic mugs?  The Brita pitcher?  A lot of stuff I can take to the recycling center down the road, which will be inconvenient, but a lot of plastic they probably won't take. Help!  I'm a Plastic-Free Newbie....

dave
dave

I am working on biodegradeable (cold compostable bags) compostable and other projects. We have yet to see how the 'nano clay' freshness extenders could be used in a true degradeable or compostable bag. If you want to learn more about the best 'green' material for bags try www.telles-mirel.com. You have a lot of interesting things on your website. Would love to talk to you further.

Anonymous
Anonymous

IMTEK in Alpharetta, GA (website: www.no-odor.com) sells Smeeleze cloth bag of clay pellets? that absorb ethylene to keep produce fresh. (770) 667-8621. Made in the USA

Anonymous
Anonymous

I was going to suggest paper bags with clay integrated & read your update of 12/21/07 which suggested basically the same. I also wonder why an ordinary french clay, or other medicinal or fine clays wouldn't work as well. Most clays do NOT care WHAT they absorb .. they'll absorb almost anything wet, slimy, etc. & apparently at least some gases. WHY NOT ordinary clay in paper bag to shake around the produce?

Justin
Justin

What about using a clay pot? We could make some clay boxes with lids that you could put fruits and veggies into.

terrible person
terrible person

Oh, and here is an interesting article on how slum-dwellers in India have become recyclers. Now, if only they could get them decent working conditions.

terrible person
terrible person

How about Navratilova Fresh bags?But seriously, here is an article from today's SF Chronicle about how neither plastic nor paper bags are all that great -- reusable cloth bags are the best!And here is one about how SF Congresswoman and Speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi, is trying to make up for failing to do much for the environment in legislation by switching the House of Representatives cafeteria to healthier food and biodegrable dishes and tableware. Yeah, but do they actually compost, or does everything just end up in the same landfill anyway?Note that the Senate hasn't changed anything.

Burbanmom
Burbanmom

That is SO AWESOME! Great work, Beth! You're like the Ralph Nader of plastic police!

BethTerry
BethTerry moderator

Hi Tinsel. First, congratulations on the changes you've made and those you're about to make. My first piece of advice is to go step by step and not try to do it all at once. My next piece of advice is to get your hands on a copy of my book Plastic-Free, which is really a step by step guide on how to do this. If you don't want to buy it, you can borrow it from the library. There's also an electronic version and an audio version. As for what to do with old plastic, many people donate it to thrift stores, Freecycle, etc. or repurpose it themselves for non-food uses. I'm glad you found this site. I hope the information here is helpful to you.

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